×

VIP Registration

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

Trish Clark Gallery

  • 1 Bowen Avenue
  • New Zealand

37 years of high-level art world engagement underpins Trish Clark representing noted artists across media and generations.

Trish Clark Gallery opened its central Auckland location at 1 Bowen Avenue in April 2014, marking 30 years since owner Trish Clark began her original gallery in Auckland’s High Street, having established a private dealership two years prior in 1982. Then representing such artists as Gordon Walters, Milan Mrkusich, Billy Apple, Stephen Bambury and Julia Morison, Clark relinquished the gallery to raise her 3 children and turned to high-level art consultancy for 25 years. In 1988 she established the New Zealand Moet & Chandon Art Foundation, directing it for 9 years; she consulted to and grew significant private and corporate collections; she chaired Auckland Council’s Advisory Panel for Public Art 2009-2013; her Board role at NZ Maritime Museum since 2009 was instrumental in achieving a more sustainable future for the Museum in 2018, joining the larger Auckland Council family under RFA, alongside Auckland Art Gallery.

Now representing 21 artists, senior and emerging, Trish Clark Gallery has also introduced a number of renowned international artists to the Australasian region, including Anthony McCall, Alfredo Jaar and Kimsooja. Trish Clark Gallery’s strong representation of women artists emerges from her 70’s feminist activism, and her presentation at Auckland Art Fair 2019 will draw together works from four New Zealand artists noted for their feminist stances and readings in their works: Alexis Hunter (deceased), Marie Shannon, Heather Straka and Christine Webster. Through photographic and painting means, these four artists have produced strong bodies of work over solid decades of practice, though Hunter is better known in Europe than New Zealand, the only New Zealand artist included in Vienna’s highly prestigious Verbund Collection of Feminist Avant-Garde; Shannon’s work is currently the subject of a touring survey exhibition; Straka continues to explore through diverse subject matter the singular question of identity that underpins all her work; and Webster’s work from the 80’s and 90’s is stunningly prescient of contemporary gender issues.

Trish Clark Gallery’s AAF19 presentation of these four artists is timely and lively, drawing out large themes and inter-relationships through a tight grouping of works.